Aug 28

Here’s a picture of Oso Blanco, a powerful new improv band who played Baby’s All Right on Monday. It’s Ryan Sawyer on drums and vocals, Colin Stetson on bass sax, Nate Wooley on trumpet and amplifier, and C. Spencer Yeh on violin and vocals.

Aug 27
This gig is about more than a night out: It’s about what one woman’s return means, what it represents. Born within a month of Madonna and Michael Jackson, Kate Bush remains a rare female embodiment of complete creative control, something she established when the music business was a proper business. She was the first woman to write and perform a British #1 (“Wuthering Heights”) and have a British #1 album (Never for Ever), and she’s also produced her own work since 1982’s The Dreaming. She still defines her career, resolutely, on her own terms, but this doesn’t mean it’s not right to gawp at her uncritically—although tonight’s gig is a great one, it isn’t perfect.

Jude Rogers reviews Kate Bush’s first concert in 35 years. (via pitchfork)

Not a big fan of the paralipsis here:

Here is a 56-year-old woman who looks like a 56-year-old woman, in a long black coat, black hair trailing down her back, singing to us. She doesn’t look like an idol at all. There’ll be too much discussion about her beauty, of course—Robert Plant, an artist similarly sexual in his younger years, and on his own path, never gets that now—but it is wonderful that she looks as she does on the stage. This isn’t kowtowing to convention, after all. This is mum doing whatever the hell she wants.

Similarly, I’m not even going to talk about how this paragraph has its cliché and disdains it too.

(Reblogged from pitchfork)
“誰でもロンリー” by YUKI. Taken from the album 誰でもロンリー.

mbmelodies:

sayonarababy:

nakatameal:

YUKI - Daredemo Lonely

This song has literally taken over my life…

…and recently, mine as well.

"Daredemo Lonely" would make for a great comeback story if YUKI actually needed one. She doesn’t though…she was the lead singer of a band that was extremely popular in the ’90s, and her solo career has been just as bountiful - her last four album have all hit the top of the Oricon Charts, and there is no reason for her next one to break that streak. I mostly know her singles, which I half-remember as mainly being guitar-centric, mid-tempo pop that made for good Music Station fare but that’s about it (with some exceptions).

Yet her newest single is fantastic, and an absolute eye opener. It partially kicks up a nostalgia for MEG I forgot I had, but ultimately is strong all its own. Part of its strength lies in how it’s a somewhat defeatist tune - the title translates to “Everyone Is Lonely,” and despite the disco gloss, tends to sound surprisingly resigned. YUKI’s singing isn’t quite as peppy as it can get (click that hyperlink above to see her really push herself), and a rough, rough translation hints at parts of this finding YUKI talking about regret (or at least feelings of coming up short) paired with more wide-reaching sentiments of wishing for easier times gone by. “Daredemo Lonely” eyes the dancefloor, but refuses to leave the pain at home.

I’ve been trying to figure out who produced this for, like, a week…and turns out it’s the guy who always produces her singles. But the folks who helped write, compose and play on this made this all click for me. The Tokyo outfit Give Me Wallets worked on this, and it’s the best thing they’ve ever been part of to date - not to get too JAPAN INDIE on you, but their biggest weakness has always been their awkward vocals. But here, YUKI handles it like a pro (which…well, she is) which allows Give Me Wallets to lay down a smooth, ennui-rich disco-pop background.

If I did Singles Jukebox I would have given this ten out of ten — peppy melancholy is basically my favorite look in pop music.

(Reblogged from mbmelodies)
Aug 24

kyarychan:

Her debut mini-album “Moshimoshi Harajuku” was released 3 years ago on August 17, 2011. Congratulations Kyary! :)

Happy new year to everyone observing the Pamyu Pamyu Revolutionary calendar

(Reblogged from mbmelodies)

Pete Swanson and Alberich both played excellent sets at Baby’s All Right on Friday night. Alberich’s Kris Lapke delivers with intimidating presence, almost like an American Philip Best, but despite the aggression his music also feels charged with unbearable sadness: the tragic keyboard lines are snowed in by gusts of windy noise.

Swanson, too, is one of the most dynamic, exciting performers I’ve seen in electronic music. His set threaded a short synthetic melody through ecstatic, grinding percussive noise. Apparently this could be his last show here for quite a while — wherever you get a chance to see him I recommend it highly.